Summary

Status: First edition 2005; second edition 2009

Ohio Archaeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures is a fascinating journey of discovery into what scientists know about a series of American Indian cultures that flourished in the state for over 12,000 years. Author Bradley T. Lepper, Curator of Archaeology, Ohio Historical Society, explores the daily life, astounding achievements and mysterious legacies of the first “Ohioans,” from the earliest Paleoindian hunters to the last Fort Ancient farmers before European contact. This beautiful 304-page, coffee table-style book contains over 340 color illustrations, including photographs of archaeological sites, excavations and research labs, museum artifacts, a series of original artworks, computer graphics of reconstructed sites, and maps and timelines for each of Ohio’s six archaeological periods. Ohio Archaeology also presents 28 feature articles contributed by top regional scholars about specific archaeological sites and investigations (see Table of Contents). While the book focuses on recent archaeological discoveries, Ohio Archaeology also examines the discipline’s past and future. Historian Dr. Terry Barnhart contributes an intriguing essay about Ohio’s important role in the development of American archaeology from the late 1700s to the early 1900s. The epilogue, “Legacies,” closes with an introspective summary of the scientific and cultural issues being debated by archaeologists, American Indians and government officials in the 21st century.

Publisher – orders

Ohio Archaeology: An Illustrated Chronicle of Ohio’s Ancient American Indian Cultures, published by Orange Frazer Press, Wilmington, Ohio. For orders contact: (800) 852-9332; orangefrazer.com (see Nature). 

Distinctions

Pubic Audience Book Award (top honors), Society for American Archaeology, national conference awards program, Austin, Texas, 2007.

Resources

OA book article

Ancient Ohio Art Series 

Support

The Ohio Archaeology book, a collaborative effort among numerous scholars and institutions, was made possible with support from MeadWestvaco, Bart and Jamae van Eck, George Gund Foundation, Ohio Archaeological Council, Ohio Arts Council, Ohio Historical Society, Ohio Humanities Council, and the Wohlgemuth Herschede Foundation.