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Creelsboro and the Cumberland: A Living History is a one-hour documentary that examines the history and culture of a rural valley along the Cumberland River in Russell County, Kentucky. The documentary follows Janie-Rice Brother, Principal Scholar and Architectural Historian, as she compiles archival research, architectural surveys, oral histories and family photographs about the Creelsboro valley. The following promotional materials are available for media outlets, organizations and educators. If you need additional information, photos or interviews, contact: Tom Law, Project Director, Voyageur, 513-871-0590, email: contactus@voyageurmedia.org

Documents

Creelsboro Fact Sheet (pdf)

Creelsboro Media Release (pdf)

Creelsboro Promo Images – list captions (pdf)

Logos 

Image CR_01: Program logo

Creelsboro and the Cumberland: A Living History (jpg)

 

Image CR_02: Series logo

Kentucky Archaeology & Heritage Series (jpg)

 

Photographs 

Image CR_03: Janie-Rice Brother, Principal Scholar and Architectural Historian (jpg)

The one-hour documentary follows Janie-Rice Brother, Principal Scholar and Architectural Historian, as she conducts field surveys, archival research, and oral histories with area residents. Credit: Kentucky Archaeological Survey, 2015.

 

Image CR_04: Aerial view of Creelsboro (jpg)

Incorporated in 1836, Creelsboro is located on the north bank of the Cumberland River. This single frame was taken from a series of drone aerial videos created for the project in October 2015. Credit: Kentucky Archaeological Survey, 2015.

 

Image CR_05: Creelsboro Landing, 1890s (jpg)

Artist Dennis Thrasher was commissioned to create two artworks depicting key moments in the history of the Creelsboro valley. “Creelsboro Landing, 1890s” shows the steamboat Reuben Dunbar arriving at the Creelsboro Landing on the north side of the Cumberland River during a “high” spring tide.  Artwork Credit: Dennis Thrasher. Copyright: Kentucky Archaeological Survey, 2019.

Image CR_06: Irvin Store, 1920s (jpg)

Artist Dennis Thrasher was commissioned to create two artworks depicting key moments in the history of the Creelsboro valley. “Irvin Store, 1920s,” shows the Irvin Store, once located in Creelsboro, on a Saturday afternoon in the fall when the valley’s population was at its peak.  Artwork Credit: Dennis Thrasher. Copyright: Kentucky Archaeological Survey, 2019.

Image CR_07: Rowena Steamboat, 1900s (jpg)

The Rowena was one of the last steamboats to serve communities along the Upper Cumberland River from the 1910s until it sank at Greasy Creek Sholes in 1934. Residents of Creelsboro valley relied on steamboats for travel and trade before paved roads and the construction of Wolf Creek Dam in the 1940s. Credit: The Porter Family.

 

Image CR_08: Creelsboro school, 1920s (jpg)

Creelsboro’s schoolhouse served students from first through eighth grade during the 1920s. After ninth grade, students from the Creelsboro valley went to high school in Russell Springs or Jamestown, boarding with relatives or friends during the week and returning home for the weekends. Credit: The Porter Family.

Image CR_09: Aaron McClure house, 1800s (jpg)

The McClure family has lived in the Swan Pond Bottom section of the Creelsboro valley for eight generations. The Aaron McClure home was originally built as a one-story house in the 1840s. Aaron’s son, James, added the second story before this photograph was taken. Credit: The McClure Family.

 

Image CR_10: Creelsboro, 1920s (jpg)

There are few photographs of life in Creelsboro before the 1940s. This rare photograph was taken on a ridge just north of the Creelsboro town center. High resolution scans revealed three unidentified children standing in the foreground; two on the roof of a shed, and one near a bush. Credit: The Tupman Family.

 

Image CR_11: Parker H. Jackman portrait, ca 1875 (jpg)

Parker H. Jackman was born into slavery in the Creelsboro valley about 1845. After serving in the U.S. Colored Troops (Union Army), Jackman became a teacher in Russell County. He then moved to Columbia in Adair County, where he established the Columbia Colored School, serving the African American community as a teacher, principal, and Baptist minister until his death in 1915. Credit: Adair County Public Library.

 

 

 

Image CR_12: Irvin Store, 1988 (jpg)

The Irvin Store, established by J.D. Irvin about 1885, served not only the residents of the Creelsboro valley, but also customers from across the region. Irvin Store provided everything from shoes and clothing to plows and coffins. The store was a focal point of the community until it was closed and demolished. Credit: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, CEO Report, 1988.